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What is Crush in Wine Country

As we move in to our harvesting season, you may hear the term “Crush” in wine country throughout the fall. You may understand its meaning, but let’s break it down for you so that you sound like an expert the next time a colleague broaches this topic. Crush is the term used to describe the process of wine grapes being crushed to release their juice. The term is also used to describe the harvest season. There really is no better time to come to Sonoma County than when the grapes are being harvested. The aroma of ripening fruit in the air mixes with the excitement of anyone who has a stake in wine, from the growers to the drinkers.

If you have never been to Sonoma County and are thinking of bringing a group or meeting here, then this is your chance! Grape harvest generally begins in August with the light-skinned grapes such as Chardonnay and ends in late September or October with the dark-skinned grapes such as Syrah and Cabernet Sauvignon. Harvest is dependent on summer weather patterns and the sugar content (called a Brix count) of the grapes themselves so that the dates do vary each year. However please realize that this is our busiest season as well, so if you are thinking about bringing a group to our destination during crush then the time to start planning for 2018 is now!

Sonoma Wine Country Weekend, Sonoma County Harvest Fair, Sonoma Valley Crush, The Kendall Jackson Harvest Celebration, as well as Harvest parties at many of the wineries in Sonoma County are all options when bringing a group or program to Sonoma County during Crush. To get started now, please contact our sales office. The benefits of working with our team is assistance collecting RFPs, arranging site visits, providing marketing assistance, and best of all our cash incentive of up to $4000!

 

Our Sonoma County Tourism Team brings a wealth of local knowledge and extensive professional experience. We are here to help! Contact us.

 

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