Quantcast Antiquing in Sonoma County 2-Day Itinerary | Sonoma County (Official Site)
 

Antiquing in Sonoma County 2-Day Itinerary

Treasures await around the next bend as you wind your way from antique store to antique store along the back roads of western Sonoma County.

The treasure might be a beautiful view, an amazing bargain, a delicious meal in an out-of-the-way eatery, or that one-of-a-kind item you’ve been searching for.

Exploration and discovery are the name of the game, and the winding roadways, rolling hills, and quirky towns of western Sonoma County offer the perfect antiquing getaway.

Antiquing: Enjoying the thrill of the chase while pursuing beautiful, valuable, or intriguing antiques and vintage items by poring through an assortment of goods.

Whether you prefer a well-organized display of carefully selected antiques or love to poke through dusty corners and jumbled shelves for that overlooked gem, you’ll have plenty of opportunities to indulge yourself while also enjoying Sonoma County’s stunning scenery and laid-back lifestyle on this two-day antiquing itinerary.

This isn’t a complete list, but merely a starting point for creating your own antiquing adventure exploring western Sonoma County. Some of the smaller shops may only be open limited hours, such as Thursday to Sunday or Friday to Monday, so it pays to check ahead of time if you’re interested in a specific place.

And, of course, it always pays to keep your eyes peeled for signs for yard, barn, rummage, or garage sales. You never know what you might find on any given day.

Written by Sonoma Insider Patricia Lynn Henley.

Written by Sonoma Insider Suzie Rodriguez

From Highway 101 (the main north-south artery in central Sonoma County) in the town of Cotati, head west on Highway 116 (also called the Gravenstein Highway). The stretch of Highway 116 from Cotati to Sebastopol is known as Antique Row.

This two-lane roadway winds its way through rural Sonoma County, taking you past an eclectic mix of local businesses, such as plant nurseries, a yarn store, barbecue joints, a custom woodworking shop, even a fortune teller. Hand-painted signs offer various items for sale, like eggs or goats.

If you love rummaging through lots of stuff, just a short way down the road you’ll find two side-by-side opportunities: Jewels to Junk (8039 Gravenstein Highway, Cotati, 707-548-1684), a small thrift shop offering new and used merchandise (including antiques), and Gullick’s Antiques & Collectibles, also known as Greg’s Stuff (8025 Gravenstein Highway, Cotati, 707-799-6682).

The front sign at Greg’s Stuff promises “A little bit of everything!” Inside you’ll find 3,200 square feet of aisle after aisle piled high with an array of items ranging from sports and military equipment to kitchen gadgets, tools, toys, and household décor. It’s a fun stop for those who like foraging, and Greg can often tell you the story behind a particular piece.

As you continue west on Highway 116, keep an eye out for signs for the Farmer’s Wife Barntique (7801 Gravenstein Highway 116, Cotati, 707-338-2315), a nonprofit group raising money for worthy local causes by filling a drafty, two-room barn with donated items on the first weekend of each month, Friday to Sunday.

The inventory varies, ranging from antique and vintage to mid-century and modern. Barntique gets most of its donations from estates and estate sales, and keeps only the best items, passing everything else on to other local charities. If you’re nearby on the first weekend of the month, it’s definitely worth a look.

About four miles farther west along Highway 116 toward the town of Sebastopol, Motley Treasures Trading Company (3920 Gravenstein Highway S., Sebastopol, 707-824-1907) presents clean, bright, and neat displays of colorful and fun antiques and collectibles, housed in an old grocery store that was built in the 1930s. This is a great place to browse for unique pieces, particularly those with a rustic flair. “I pick up anything that pops,” said owner Denis Rioual. “Motley is a good word; it means varied.”

Step back into a bygone era at Windmill Antiques (2830 Gravenstein Highway S., Sebastopol, 707-823-7954), a warm, cozy, and welcoming store in a building that originally housed the local saloon, barbershop, and tack store. The main room still includes the gorgeous wooden bar, complete with railing, mirrors, and shelving.

In business for more than 20 years, Windmill Antiques features Native American baskets and jewelry, tools, pocket knives, and a little bit of everything else that appeals, spread neatly through a series of rambling rooms.

Then it’s on to the diverse selection at Food for Thought Antiques (2701 Gravenstein Highway S., Sebastopol, 707-823-3101), which offers a wonderful mix of collectors’ books, unique garden sculptures, rusty farm relics, fine china and glassware, sterling silver, vintage linens, antique and vintage jewelry, furniture, and artwork. Some items are donated and some are on consignment, plus seven dealers rent floor space in the 3,200-square-foot building.

Primarily run by volunteers, the place benefits the nonprofit Food for Thought, which provides nourishment and other services to Sonoma County residents affected by AIDS. It’s a great place to explore, with an eye for fun and whimsy.

Next door you’ll find the Antique Society (2661 Gravenstein Highway S., Sebastopol, CA 95472), in a 20,000-square-foot building that served as a door factory in the 1930s, and a furnace manufacturing company in the 1940s.

Today, with more than 100 dealers, it’s Northern California’s largest antique collective. The high-beamed, vaulted ceiling contributes to the sense of expansive space, and it’s fun to wander the wide aisles of this bright, clean, and well-organized space. Whatever you’re looking for, chances are good you’ll find it here.

Ready for a bite to eat? At the front of the Antique Society building you’ll find Bumblebee Farms Bakery & Café (2661 Gravenstein Highway S., 707-694-3450), a cozy eatery with tasty food and a simple menu that changes daily, depending on what’s fresh and best. Each day the menu generally offers a single type of soup, one salad, and one type of sandwich, as well as a delicious variety of baked goods and coffee.

Sebastopol offers a lot of other lunch options, including a number of top vegan and vegetarian restaurants; the renowned Zazu Kitchen + Farm (6770 McKinley St., Sebastopol, 707-523-4814) in The Barlow, a culinary, arts, and business center; and Ramen Gaijin, blending traditional Japanese techniques with the freshest local ingredients. For more ideas, check our listings of Sebastopol restaurants.

Refueled and refreshed, it’s back to the treasure hunt, picking up where we left off on Highway 116.

If you’re in town on the weekend, Midgley’s Country Flea Market (2300 Gravenstein Highway S., Sebastopol, 707-823-7874) offers a long-established (more than 40 years) outdoor market featuring unique antiques, knick-knacks, tools, pictures, clothing, furniture, toys, and whatever else the vendors bring on any given Saturday or Sunday.

The regulars say Sunday is the best day to shop (or sell). If you’re a flea market aficionado, you’ll want to visit the market first thing in the morning, to get the best deals before they’re gone, and then move on to the area’s antique shops.

Trader Buck’s Antiques (1140 Gravenstein Highway S., Sebastopol, 707-829-7722) looks small and sleepy from the outside, but step inside and you’ll find several large rooms holding a quirky collection of antiques and unusual items, as well as a half-acre yard with garden statuary, fountains, and patio furniture. There’s a bit of everything spread out all around you.

From Highway 116 turn right (east) on state Highway 12 in downtown Sebastopol, and you’ll find the consignment furniture store Attico (6791 Sebastopol Ave. (Highway 12), Sebastopol, 707-861-3771). It features both antique and contemporary furniture displayed in small “vignettes” to help imagine how they might look in your home. Typically, French or Italian music plays in the background, and the inventory includes French, rustic, antique, or mid-century pieces, many with a European flair.

If your idea of a great antiquing trip includes checking every thrift store in the area, just in case they hold hidden delights, you have two possibilities in Sebastopol: Sutter Hospice Thrift (748 Gravenstein Highway N., Sebastopol, 707-824-4712) and Goodwill (6826 Sebastopol Ave., Sebastopol, 707-823-3551).

Of course, this is just a sampling of all the antiquing possibilities in and around Sebastopol: to see some of the other options, check the map of Antique Row.

And if you’re ready for a break from antiquing, consider winetasting at The Barlow, at the tasting rooms for Kosta Browne Winery, La Follette Wines, Macphail Family Wines, and Marimar Estate Vineyards & Winery. This is Wine Country, after all. How better to relax than with a bit of the grape?

Lodging

When you’re ready to call it a day, lodging possibilities include the serenity among the vines at Pearlessence Vineyard Inn, or a night in the forest at the Avalon Bed & Breakfast. If you prefer to stay in town, closer to shops and restaurants, consider the Sebastopol Inn or Fairfield Inn & Suites Sebastopol.

Dining

If you didn’t eat lunch at Zazu Kitchen + Farm or Ramen Gaijin, they’re great options for dinner. But Sebastopol offers many other choices. 

At Peter Lowell’s (7385 Healdsburg Ave., #101, Sebastopol, 707-829-1077), chefs Natalie Goble and Joe Zoble create an ever-changing, Italian-inspired, Californian cuisine menu, featuring local ingredients.

For even more ideas of where to dine, check our listings of Sebastopol restaurants.

If you want a bit of evening entertainment, Hopmonk Tavern and Jasper O’Farrell’s Pub offer live music, or check the event calendars at the Sebastopol Community Center, Sebastopol Center for the Arts, Main Stage West, or Rialto Cinemas.

To jump-start your day, head to Coffee Catz (6761 Sebastopol Ave., Sebastopol, 707-829-6600), a western Sonoma County institution that bills itself as “Sebastopol’s living room,” offering coffee and homemade treats and noshes.

For a more substantial breakfast, consider the East West Café (128 N. Main St., Sebastopol, 707-829-2822), a Mediterranean-style eatery with vegetarian and vegan options, or head slightly west of town to the Fork Roadhouse (9890 Bodega Highway, Sebastopol, 707-634-7575) for farm-to-table organic comfort food in a cozy, rustic setting.

Before continuing your antiquing odyssey, this is the time to visit any of the Sebastopol antiques spots that you wanted to see but missed yesterday. You might also want to explore downtown Sebastopol, with its diverse mix of local shops featuring crafts, health food, clothing, books, housewares, toys, artwork, and more.

And if you haven’t visited The Barlow yet, you might want to check out the 220,000-square-foot, park-like business center’s shops, tasting rooms, and eateries.

When you’re ready to resume antiquing, it’s time to head back into the countryside. From downtown Sebastopol, head west on Highway 116 (follow the signs to Jenner) for slightly more than three miles, and take a left onto Graton Road toward the tiny town of Graton.

Your goal is Mr. Ryder and Company (9040 Graton Road, Graton, 707-824-8223), a collective of 13 dealers offering carefully selected and well-organized items in a light an airy 1906 Victorian storefront. Here you’ll find furniture, household items, artwork, glassware, and more. Fans of this store say it’s a dangerous place, because they never leave without buying something.

The owner, Betty Ann Sutton, is active in animal rescue (the store is named after her late dog), and the people who work here are all animal advocates, so this dog-friendly shop “welcomes all well-behaved dogs and people.”

If you’re ready for a bite to eat, Graton actually has a strong culinary reputation. Serving as a local gathering spot, the Willow Wood Market Café (9020 Graton Road, Graton, 707-823-0233) doubles as a general store and a café/soda fountain, serving down-home comfort food using fresh local ingredients in a relaxed and family-friendly setting.

Across the street, the Underwood Bar & Bistro (9113 Graton Road, Graton, 707-823-7023) offers big-city style in what used to be a simple little apple cannery town, offering lunch and dinner with relaxed sophistication. Local winemakers are often spotted here, and Food and Wine magazine listed Underwood as No. 4 of “America’s 50 Most Amazing Wine Experiences.”

After exploring cute and cozy downtown Graton, continue heading west on Graton Road. Trees arch overhead as you wind your way along this curving two-lane rural roadway, with something new to see around each bend. In slightly less than six miles, the road dead-ends in the laid-back town of Occidental.

Turn left and you’re on the Bohemian Highway, a highly scenic 10-mile stretch of two-lane road connecting Monte Rio in the north with Freestone in the south. Occidental lies at the midpoint of this two-lane byway. Occidental’s two-block-long main street houses galleries, gift shops, and renowned restaurants.

Continue south on the beautiful Bohemian Highway. This area attracts cyclists, car clubs, and anyone who enjoys getting off the beaten path in a gorgeous natural setting.

Your next stop is in the tiny community of Freestone, at the southern end of the Bohemian Highway, at Enduring Comforts (142 Bohemian Highway, Sebastopol, 707-874-111), offering antique, vintage, and gift items in a cozy setting.

If you have time to explore Freestone, this tiny community has a lot to offer, including a destination bakery (fans drive miles out of their way to buy their breads), a wonderful wine tasting room, artisan cheeses, and a spa sanctuary. For details, see Things to do in Freestone.

From the Bohemian Highway, turn right onto the Bodega Highway, and follow it about five miles to the village of Bodega, which is basically a scattering of houses and businesses spread along the roadway and nestled against the hillsides.

Seagull Antiques, Gifts & Collectibles (17190 Bodega Highway, Bodega, 707-876-3229) offers a wide variety of items, including memorabilia from Alfred Hitchcock’s 1963 movie “The Birds,” which was shot in this area, as well as a selection of vintage and antique pieces, beach décor, postcards, and trinkets.

Housed in a former livery stable, Hamilton Trading Co. (17175 Bodega Highway, Bodega, 707-876-3035) features a wide variety of antiques and collectibles. If you’re after mid-century modern, you won’t find it here. You will find antique swords, guns, and armaments, and a large collection of antique tools. There’s also an extensive selection of books, plus paintings, prints, drawings, tribal art, and jewelry. It’s a great shop to wander around and see what you might find.

The Bodega Landmark Studio Collection (17255 Bodega Highway, Bodega, 707-876-3477) primarily presents the work of more than 25 established and emerging regional artists, with hundreds of one-of-a-kind pieces, but it also offers vintage photographic equipment, photographs, prints, maps, and books. The old maps and prints are in drawers, so you need to ask to see them.

And it doesn’t offer antiques, but if you have time you might want to drop in at the Artisan’s Co-Op (17175 Bodega Highway, Bodega, 707-876-9830), which features the diverse work of as many as 40 local artists and artisans. It’s a small shop, filled to the brim with hand-made delights.

There are a number of other sights to see in Bodega, from its picturesque post office to the places that served as locations for filming “The Birds.” If you can, take some time to look around, browse the various shops, and soak up the atmosphere.

When you’re ready, it’s only four miles to the spectacular coastline. Continue west on Bodega Highway, then left onto Coast Highway 1, into the town of Bodega Bay. Your objective here is Eclectic Amanda (1580 Eastshore Drive, Bodega Bay, 800-528-6170), a small shop (that also serves as an eBay drop off location) offering a mix of antiques, gifts, and coastal treasures. You’ll mostly find smaller items here, like jewelry, perfume bottles, vintage toys, ladies’ hats, or old clocks and radios.

This completes your antiquing tour, just in time to appreciate the beauty and bounty of Bodega Bay and the Pacific Ocean.

If you want to stretch your legs, Bodega Head offers great bluff-top trails, and the possibility of spotting seals or whales in the water. Dining options vary from clam chowder and crab sandwiches outdoors at the Spud Point Crab Company (1910 Westshore Road, Bodega Bay, 707-875-9272) to the casual atmosphere and Michelin-starred cuisine at the Terrapin Creek Café (1580 Eastshore Road, Bodega Bay, 707-875-2700); for more options, check our Directory of Sonoma County Restaurants, and under cities click on Bodega Bay.

Of course, there are many other options for antiquing throughout Sonoma County.

In the south, the town of Petaluma boasts a long list of antique galleries, and twice a year (spring and fall) hosts the renowned Petaluma Antique Faire, when the historic downtown center transforms into an antique marketplace.

In northern Sonoma County, the town of Healdsburg also offers a multitude of antique shops and collectives, and the Healdsburg Museum and Historical Society hosts the Healdsburg Antiques and Arts Fair twice a year in the town’s central plaza.

For even more antiquing options, check our Sonoma County Shopping Directory and click on Antiques & Collectibles.